Unfortunately, some businesses only recognize the need for contract management software once a problem arises – when it’s too late to enact “an ounce of prevention.”

Here’s a perfect example: Consider the “evergreen clause,” or the autorenewal.

Investopedia defines the evergreen clause as: “A contract provision that automatically renews the length of the agreement after a predetermined period, unless notice for termination is given. Evergreens are often used for long term agreements such as memberships or maintenance contracts.”

How does this sneak up on the unsuspecting contract administrator? In an article on the website Mondaq, author Steve Dutton poses the situation of a business owner deciding to cancel the license agreement for a certain computer software which was purchased to improve productivity, but ended up not being effectively used.

Upon calling the vendor, the representative notifies the business owner that the license agreement does not allow a simple cancellation. Instead, the business owner is contractually obligated to continue paying for the software for another full year. The real culprits here are the terms and conditions of the software license containing the automatic renewal or evergreen clause.

Automatic renewals often come with a definition of when notice must be given to cancel a contract. The problem isn’t that evergreen clauses are inherently bad. It’s that notification dates for cancellation have a habit of being institutionally “forgotten” – unless there’s a serious problem.

Contract management software helps you shed light on these forgotten contracts in two key ways. First, you can customize notes and fields to record specific deliverables of vendor/service providers, thus giving you a history of performance. Second, you can set up automatic reminders for key renewal dates. This feature is in all Contract Assistant versions, and in the Enterprise edition you can even configure alerts to be distributed via email.

Setting an alert or reminder 60 to 90 days out from a renewal notice cut-off notice date should give you enough time to review performance and get input before contacting the vendor/service provider. At the very least, it may give your business the leverage it needs to alter a contract to meet your company’s needs better.

For additional discussion and recommendations about evergreen clauses, read this blog post by Law 4 Small Business.

It may not always be possible to avoid evergreen clauses, but you can certainly get ahead of any potential problems if you’re using good contract management software.

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